Revolutionary weight loss medications

Get access to semaglutide (GLP-1) medications, like Wegovy and Ozempic, if appropriate. These once-weekly shots work by mimicking your body's natural hormones, helping you feel fuller faster and for longer, when paired with healthy lifestyle changes.


Ozempic

semaglutide

Ozempic ℞

Wegovy

semaglutide

Due to a nationwide Wegovy shortage, Wegovy will not be available to new patients

Wegovy ℞

Supply update: Novo Nordisk, the manufacturer of Wegovy, is anticipating a supply shortage of Wegovy at 0.25 mg, 0.5 mg, and 1 mg doses through September. Learn more here

Safety info: Ozempic treats type 2 diabetes but may be prescribed for weight loss, if appropriate. Wegovy treats obesity or overweight (with weight-related problems), along with diet and exercise.Ozempic and Wegovy may have serious side effects, including possible thyroid tumors. Do not use if you or your family have a history of a type of thyroid cancer called MTC or MEN 2. Read more about serious warnings and safety info.


How it works

We help you lose weight by pairing revolutionary medication with coaching, care, and healthy lifestyle changes to make it last.

Share your health history and weight loss goals with us online to get started.

A Ro-affiliated provider will review your answers and get back to you within a few days.

If you’re a good fit for the program, your provider will order a metabolic lab test. The test will help you understand how your body’s working right now.  

You can use your insurance to test at any Quest location (most insurance accepted), or purchase an at-home blood collection kit through Ro for an additional cost.

If you live in a state where Quest is not available, we’ll automatically send you an at-home collection kit for no charge. Read more.

After reviewing your results, your provider will determine if you’re eligible for medication. If you are, they’ll tailor a program with prescription treatment best suited to your unique biology.

If a medication is prescribed that can be covered by insurance, our concierge partner connects with your insurance company to help get the cost of medication covered. If coverage is denied, we'll help you understand your options, including paying cash.

We’ll send your prescription to your preferred pharmacy to be filled. At this point, your $145/mo membership begins and you’ll unlock all of the ongoing support you’ll need during treatment.

Please note that due to GLP-1 shortages, you may experience a wait. Know we're doing everything we can to get medication to you quickly. Learn more.

You’ll have everything you need during treatment, including on-demand provider access, medication management, and ongoing refill support.

get video check ups with qualified medical advisors to review your progress on the Body Program

$99 to get started, $145/mo for ongoing care

What's included?

Provider consultation

GLP-1 prescription (if appropriate)

Insurance concierge

Ongoing care & support

Tools to track progress

Start now – $99

Please note: The cost of medication and lab testing is not included in the Body Program

Learn more about pricing

Medication is prescribed only if appropriate.

Thousands of people are losing weight with GLP-1 medications

Hear from real Ro members who are hitting their weight loss goals through the Body Program. These Body Program members were paid for sharing their stories.

  • “I’ve had some pretty amazing success. I’m down 15 pounds and I couldn’t be happier."

    Sonia, Ro Member

  • “It's really helping handle my cravings better, which is what I really like about this program."

    James, Ro Member

  • “It was like a switch once I started the medication, I just wasn’t so obsessed with food.”

    Chaleeta, Ro Member

Weight loss FAQs

Important safety information

Important Safety Information for Wegovy (semaglutide) injection

Warning: Risk of Thyroid C-Cell Tumors

  • In studies with mice and rats, semaglutide (the active ingredient in Wegovy and Ozempic) caused thyroid tumors, including thyroid cancer. It is not known if Wegovy will cause thyroid tumors or a type of thyroid cancer called medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) in people. Tell your provider if you get a lump or swelling in your neck, hoarseness, trouble swallowing, or shortness of breath. These may be symptoms of thyroid cancer.

  • Do not use Wegovy if you or any of your family have ever had a type of thyroid cancer called medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) or if you have an endocrine system condition called Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2).

What is the FDA-approved use of Wegovy?

Wegovy is a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist for chronic weight management, along with a reduced calorie diet and increased physical activity, for people with an initial body mass index (BMI) of:

  • 30 kg/m2 or greater (obesity) or

  • 27 kg/m2 or greater (overweight) in the presence of at least one weight-related comorbid condition (e.g., hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, or dyslipidemia).

Limitations of Use:

  • Wegovy should not be used in combination with other semaglutide-containing products or any other GLP-1 receptor agonist

  • The safety and efficacy of coadministration with other products for weight loss have not been established

  • Wegovy has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis

Who should not use Wegovy?

Do not use Wegovy if:

  • You or any of your family have ever had a type of thyroid cancer called medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) or if you have an endocrine system condition called Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2).

  • You have a known allergic reaction to semaglutide (the active ingredient in Wegovy or Ozempic).

How should Wegovy be administered?

You can take Wegovy with or without food. The pre-filled injector pen is self-administered as a subcutaneous injection in the stomach, thigh, or upper arm once a week on the same day every week. Your Ro-affiliated provider will guide you on a treatment regimen that may include an increase in dose every four weeks.

You should not change your dosing regimen or stop taking Wegovy as prescribed without discussing with your provider first.

What should I tell my Ro-affiliated provider before using Wegovy?
  • Wegovy has certain drug interactions. It’s important to tell your Ro-affiliated provider all of the medications you are currently taking, including prescription, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and herbal and dietary supplements.

Some medications to watch out for include:

  • Medications used to treat type 1 or type 2 diabetes, including insulin or sulfonylureas (such as Amaryl or Glucotrol XL)

  • Wegovy causes a delay in gastric emptying, so it has the potential to impact the absorption of medications that are taken by mouth at the same time. Your provider can guide you on how to schedule your medications.

  • Other GLP-1 medications, including Ozempic, Saxenda, Victoza, Byetta, or Bydureon

  • If you’re using other products for weight loss, including dietary supplements

It’s important to share your entire medical history with your provider. In particular, tell your provider if you have a past history of:

  • Type 1 or type 2 diabetes

  • Thyroid cancer

  • Pancreatitis

  • Kidney disease

  • Diabetic retinopathy

  • Depression

  • Suicidal thoughts or behavior

Tell your provider if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or breastfeeding.

  • If you are pregnant: Wegovy should not be used during pregnancy. Based on animal studies, there may be potential risks to an unborn baby from exposure to Wegovy during pregnancy. There is no benefit to weight loss during pregnancy and it may cause harm to the unborn baby.

  • If you are a female or male of reproductive potential: Discontinue Wegovy at least 2 months before a planned pregnancy since the drug can stay in the bloodstream for a long time.

  • If you are breastfeeding: Wegovy was found in the milk of lactating rats. Tell your Ro-affiliated provider if you are breastfeeding before you start Wegovy.

Pregnancy registry: There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to semaglutide (the active ingredient in Wegovy and Ozempic) during pregnancy. Pregnant women exposed to semaglutide and healthcare providers are encouraged to contact Novo Nordisk at 1-800-727-6500.

Withholding or providing inaccurate information about your health and medical history in order to obtain treatment may result in harm, including, in some cases, death.

What are the most serious side effects that I or a caregiver should monitor for when taking Wegovy?

If you are experiencing a medical emergency, call 911 or seek immediate medical attention.

These serious side effects can occur with Wegovy. You or a caregiver should carefully monitor for these side effects, especially in the beginning of treatment and with dose changes.

  • Thyroid C-Cell Tumors: In mice and rats, semaglutide (the active ingredient in Wegovy and Ozempic) caused an increase in thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). It is unknown whether Wegovy causes thyroid C-cell tumors in humans. There were cases of MTC reported in patients who took liraglutide (the active ingredient in Victoza and Saxenda) after the drug was put on the market. Wegovy is contraindicated in patients with a family history of MTC or in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Tell your provider if you get a lump or swelling in your neck, hoarseness, trouble swallowing, or shortness of breath. These may be symptoms of thyroid cancer.

  • Inflammation of Pancreas (Acute Pancreatitis): Monitor for signs of acute pancreatitis, including severe abdominal pain that does not go away, sometimes radiating to the back, with or without vomiting.

  • Acute Gallbladder Disease: Wegovy may cause gallbladder problems, including gallstones. Some gallbladder problems require surgery. Tell your provider right away if you have pain in your upper stomach, yellowing of skin or eyes (jaundice), fever, or clay-colored stools.

  • Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia): Wegovy lowers blood glucose. It can cause too low blood sugar in patients with type 2 diabetes who also take another glucose control medication. Monitor your blood sugar and watch out for signs of too low blood sugar such as dizziness, blurred vision, mood changes, sweating, or fast heartbeat.

  • Acute Kidney Injury: In people who have kidney problems, diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting may cause a loss of fluids (dehydration) which may cause kidney problems to get worse. It is important for you to drink plenty of water to help reduce your chance of dehydration.

  • Serious Allergic Reactions: Stop using Wegovy right away if you experience symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including swelling of your face, lips, tongue or throat, severe rash or itching, very rapid heartbeat, problems breathing or swallowing, or fainting or feeling dizzy.

  • Diabetic Retinopathy Complications in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: If you have type 2 diabetes, tell your provider right away if you experience changes in vision.

  • Increase in Heart Rate: Tell your provider right away if you have a racing heartbeat while at rest.

  • Suicidal Behavior and Ideation: You should pay attention to any mental health changes, especially sudden changes in your mood, behaviors, thoughts, or feelings. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any mental changes that are new, worse, or worry you.

  • Never Share a Pen: Pen-sharing poses a risk of infection.

What are the most common side effects of Wegovy?
  • Nausea

  • Diarrhea

  • Vomiting

  • Constipation

  • Abdominal pain

  • Headache

  • Fatigue

  • Dyspepsia

  • Dizziness

  • Abdominal distension

  • Eructation

  • Hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes

  • Flatulence

  • Gastroenteritis

  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription products:

  • Contact Novo Nordisk Inc. at 1-833-934-6891

  • Contact FDA MedWatch at 1-800-FDA-1088 or visit www.fda.gov/medwatch

This information is not comprehensive. Please see the full Prescribing Information for complete safety information.

Important Safety Information for Ozempic (semaglutide) injection

Warning: Risk of Thyroid C-Cell Tumors

  • In studies with mice and rats, semaglutide (the active ingredient in Ozempic and Wegovy) caused thyroid tumors, including thyroid cancer. It is not known if Ozempic will cause thyroid tumors or a type of thyroid cancer called medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) in people. Tell your provider if you get a lump or swelling in your neck, hoarseness, trouble swallowing, or shortness of breath. These may be symptoms of thyroid cancer.

  • Do not use Ozempic if you or any of your family have ever had a type of thyroid cancer called medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) or if you have an endocrine system condition called Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2).

What is the FDA-approved use of Ozempic?

Ozempic is a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist that is used:

  • with diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  • to reduce the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and established cardiovascular disease.

Limitations of Use:

  • Ozempic has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis.

  • Ozempic is not for treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

Your Ro-affiliated provider may recommend the use of Ozempic as treatment for chronic weight management (obesity or overweight).

Who should not use Ozempic?

Do not use Ozempic if:

  • You or any of your family have ever had a type of thyroid cancer called medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) or if you have an endocrine system condition called Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2).

  • You have a known allergic reaction to semaglutide (the active ingredient in Wegovy or Ozempic).

__How should Ozempic be administered? __

You can take Ozempic with or without food. The pre-filled injector pen is self-administered as a subcutaneous injection in the stomach, thigh, or upper arm once a week on the same day every week. Your Ro-affiliated provider will guide you on a treatment regimen that may include an increase in dose every four weeks.

You should not change your dosing regimen or stop taking Ozempic as prescribed without discussing with your provider first.

What should I tell my Ro-affiliated provider before using Ozempic?
  • Ozempic has certain drug interactions. It’s important to tell your Ro-affiliated provider all of the medications you are currently taking, including prescription, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and herbal and dietary supplements.

Some medications to watch out for include:

  • Medications used to treat type 1 or type 2 diabetes, including insulin or sulfonylureas (such as Amaryl or Glucotrol XL)

  • Ozempic causes a delay in gastric emptying so it has the potential to impact the absorption of medications that are taken by mouth at the same time. Your provider can guide you on how to schedule your medications.

  • Other GLP-1 medications, including Wegovy, Saxenda, Victoza, Byetta, or Bydureon

  • If you’re using other products for weight loss, including dietary supplements

It’s important to share your entire medical history with your provider. In particular, tell your provider if you have a past history of:

  • Type 1 or type 2 diabetes

  • Thyroid cancer

  • Pancreatitis

  • Kidney disease

  • Diabetic retinopathy

  • Depression

  • Suicidal thoughts or behavior

Tell your provider if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or breastfeeding.

  • If you are pregnant: Ozempic should not be used during pregnancy. Based on animal studies, there may be potential risks to an unborn baby from exposure to Ozempic during pregnancy. There is no benefit to weight loss during pregnancy and it may cause harm to the unborn baby.

  • If you are a female or male of reproductive potential: Discontinue Ozempic at least 2 months before a planned pregnancy since the drug can stay in the bloodstream for a long time.

  • If you are breastfeeding: Ozempic was found in the milk of lactating rats. Tell your Ro-affiliated provider if you are breastfeeding before you start Ozempic.

Pregnancy registry: There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to semaglutide (the active ingredient in Ozempic and Ozempic) during pregnancy. Pregnant women exposed to semaglutide and healthcare providers are encouraged to contact Novo Nordisk at 1-800-727-6500.

Withholding or providing inaccurate information about your health and medical history in order to obtain treatment may result in harm, including, in some cases, death.

__What are the most serious side effects that I or a caregiver should monitor for when taking Ozempic? __

If you are experiencing a medical emergency, call 911 or seek immediate medical attention.

These serious side effects can occur with Ozempic. You or a caregiver should carefully monitor for these side effects, especially in the beginning of treatment and with dose changes.

  • Thyroid C-Cell Tumors: In mice and rats, semaglutide (the active ingredient in Ozempic and Ozempic) caused an increase in thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). It is unknown whether Ozempic causes thyroid C-cell tumors in humans. There were cases of MTC reported in patients who took liraglutide (the active ingredient in Victoza and Saxenda) after the drug was put on the market. Ozempic is contraindicated in patients with a family history of MTC or in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Tell your provider if you get a lump or swelling in your neck, hoarseness, trouble swallowing, or shortness of breath. These may be symptoms of thyroid cancer.

  • Inflammation of Pancreas (Acute Pancreatitis): Monitor for signs of acute pancreatitis, including severe abdominal pain that does not go away, sometimes radiating to the back, with or without vomiting.

  • Diabetic Retinopathy Complications in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: If you have type 2 diabetes, tell your provider right away if you experience changes in vision.

  • Never Share a Pen: Pen-sharing poses a risk of infection.

  • Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia): Ozempic lowers blood glucose. It can cause too low blood sugar in patients with type 2 diabetes who also take another glucose control medication. Monitor your blood sugar and watch out for signs of too low blood sugar such as dizziness, blurred vision, mood changes, sweating, or fast heartbeat.

  • Acute Kidney Injury: In people who have kidney problems, diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting may cause a loss of fluids (dehydration) which may cause kidney problems to get worse. It is important for you to drink plenty of water to help reduce your chance of dehydration.

  • Serious Allergic Reactions: Stop using Ozempic right away if you experience symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including swelling of your face, lips, tongue or throat, severe rash or itching, very rapid heartbeat, problems breathing or swallowing, or fainting or feeling dizzy.

  • Acute Gallbladder Disease: Ozempic may cause gallbladder problems, including gallstones. Some gallbladder problems require surgery. Tell your provider right away if you have pain in your upper stomach, yellowing of skin or eyes (jaundice), fever, or clay-colored stools.

  • Increase in Heart Rate: Tell your provider right away if you have a racing heartbeat while at rest.

  • Suicidal Behavior and Ideation: You should pay attention to any mental health changes, especially sudden changes in your mood, behaviors, thoughts, or feelings. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any mental changes that are new, worse, or worry you.

What are the most common side effects of Ozempic?
  • Nausea

  • Vomiting

  • Diarrhea

  • Stomach pain

  • Constipation

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription products:

  • Contact Novo Nordisk Inc. at 1-833-934-6891

  • Contact FDA MedWatch at 1-800-FDA-1088 or visit www.fda.gov/medwatch

This information is not comprehensive. Please see the full Prescribing Information for complete safety information.

Important safety information

Important Safety Information for Saxenda (liraglutide) injection

Warning: Risk of Thyroid C-Cell Tumors

  • In rats and mice, Saxenda caused thyroid tumors, including thyroid cancer. It is not known if Saxenda will cause thyroid tumors or a type of thyroid cancer called medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) in people. In the post marketing period, cases of MTC in people treated with liraglutide have been reported; the data in these reports are insufficient to establish or exclude a causal relationship between MTC and liraglutide use in people. 

  • Tell your provider if you get a lump or swelling in your neck, hoarseness, trouble swallowing, or shortness of breath. These may be symptoms of thyroid cancer. 

  • Do not use Saxenda if you or any of your family have ever had a type of thyroid cancer called medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) or if you have an endocrine system condition called Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2).

What is the FDA-approved use of Saxenda?

Saxenda is a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist for chronic weight management, along with a reduced calorie diet and increased physical activity, for people with an initial body mass index (BMI) of:

  • 30 kg/m2 or greater (obesity) or

  • 27 kg/m2 or greater (overweight) in the presence of at least one weight-related comorbid condition (e.g., hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, or dyslipidemia).

Limitations of Use:

  • Saxenda should not be used in combination with other liraglutide-containing products or any other GLP-1 receptor agonist

  • The safety and efficacy of coadministration with other products for weight loss have not been established

Who should not use Saxenda?

Do not use Saxenda if:

  • You or any of your family have ever had a type of thyroid cancer called medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) or if you have an endocrine system condition called Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2).

  • You are pregnant

  • You have a known allergic reaction to Saxenda or any other GLP-1 receptor agonist

How should Saxenda be administered?

You can take Saxenda with or without food. The pre-filled injector pen is self-administered as a subcutaneous injection in the stomach, thigh, or upper arm once a day at any time of day. If injecting within the same region, the injection site should be rotated to reduce the risk of cutaneous amyloidosis.

You should not change your dosing regimen or stop taking Saxenda as prescribed without discussing with your provider first. 

What should I tell my provider before using Saxenda?
  • Saxenda has certain drug interactions. It’s important to tell your provider all of the medications you are currently taking, including prescription, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and herbal and dietary supplements. 

Some medications to watch out for include:

  • Medications for diabetes: Medications used to treat type 1 or type 2 diabetes, including insulin or sulfonylureas (such as Amaryl or Glucotrol XL)

  • Other oral medications: Saxenda causes a delay in gastric emptying, so it can impact the absorption of medications that are taken by mouth at the same time. Your provider can guide you on how to schedule your medications.

  • Other GLP-1 medications: Including Wegovy, Ozempic, Mounjaro, Trulicity, Victoza, Byetta, or Bydureon. These medications should not be taken with Saxenda.

  • Other products for weight loss: Including dietary supplements

It’s important to share your entire medical history with your provider. In particular, tell your provider if you have or have a past history of:

  • Thyroid cancer

  • Type 1 or type 2 diabetes

  • Pancreatitis or gastrointestinal disease

  • Kidney disease

  • Depression

  • Suicide attempts or active suicidal ideation

Tell your provider if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or breastfeeding. 

  • If you are pregnant: Saxenda should not be used during pregnancy. There is no benefit to weight loss during pregnancy. Based on animal studies, there may be potential risks to an unborn baby from exposure to Saxenda during pregnancy. 

  • If you are breastfeeding: It is not known if Saxenda passes into breast milk. Saxenda was found in the milk of lactating rats. Talk to your provider first about the benefits and risks of using Saxenda while breastfeeding.

Withholding or providing inaccurate information about your health and medical history in order to obtain treatment may result in harm, including, in some cases, death.

What are the most serious side effects that I or a caregiver should monitor for when taking Saxenda?

If you are experiencing a medical emergency, call 911 or seek immediate medical attention.

These serious side effects can occur with Saxenda. You or a caregiver should carefully monitor for these side effects, especially in the beginning of treatment and with dose changes.

  • Thyroid C-Cell Tumors: In rats and mice, Saxenda caused dose-dependent and treatment-duration-dependent thyroid C-cell tumors. It is unknown whether Saxenda causes thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), in humans. Cases of MTC in people treated with liraglutide have been reported in the postmarketing period; the data in these reports are insufficient to establish or exclude a causal relationship between MTC and liraglutide use in people. Saxenda is contraindicated in patients with a family history of MTC or in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Tell your provider if you get a lump or swelling in your neck, hoarseness, trouble swallowing, or shortness of breath. These may be symptoms of thyroid cancer. 

  • Inflammation of Pancreas (Acute Pancreatitis): Monitor for signs of acute pancreatitis, including severe abdominal pain that does not go away, sometimes radiating to the back, with or without vomiting.

  • Acute Gallbladder Disease: Some patients reported gallbladder problems in clinical trials, including gallstones. Some gallbladder problems require surgery. Tell your provider right away if you have pain in your upper stomach, yellowing of skin or eyes (jaundice), fever, or clay-colored stools.

  • Low Blood Sugar (Hypoglycemia): Saxenda lowers blood glucose. It can cause too low blood sugar in patients with type 2 diabetes who also take another glucose control medication. Monitor your blood sugar and watch out for signs of too low blood sugar such as dizziness, blurred vision, mood changes, sweating, or fast heartbeat.

  • Increase in Heart Rate: Tell your provider right away if you have a fast, racing heartbeat while at rest. 

  • Acute Kidney Injury: In patients treated with GLP-1 receptor agonists like Saxenda, there have been reports of acute renal failure and worsening of chronic kidney failure, sometimes requiring hemodialysis. Gastrointestinal side effects of Saxenda like diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting may cause a loss of fluids (dehydration), which may cause kidney problems if dehydration is severe. It is important to drink plenty of water to help reduce your chance of dehydration.

  • Allergic Reactions: Stop using Saxenda right away if you experience symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including swelling of your face, lips, tongue or throat, severe rash or itching, very rapid heartbeat, problems breathing or swallowing, or fainting or feeling dizzy.

  • Suicidal Behavior and Ideation: You should pay attention to any mental health changes, especially sudden changes in your mood, behaviors, thoughts, or feelings. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any mental changes that are new, worse, or worry you.

  • Never Share a Pen: Pen-sharing poses a risk of infection. 

What are the most common side effects of Saxenda?
  • Nausea

  • Diarrhea

  • Constipation

  • Vomiting

  • Injection site reactions

  • Headache 

  • Low blood sugar

  • Stomach discomfort 

  • Fatigue

  • Dizziness 

  • Stomach pain

  • Increased in lipase

  • Upper abdominal pain

  • Fever 

  • Stomach infection

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription products:

  • Contact Novo Nordisk Inc. at 1-844-363-4448

  • Contact FDA MedWatch at 1-800-FDA-1088 or visit www.fda.gov/medwatch

This information is not comprehensive. Please see the full Prescribing Information for complete safety information.