Quit smoking with the right plan for you 

This time quitting smoking is different. The right treatment plan can make this the last time you quit smoking. Get physician-prescribed medication, if appropriate, to curb cravings and nicotine gum to reduce withdrawal symptoms.

How quitting works

Using a combination of prescription bupropion and nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), can increase your chances of quitting by over 3x.*

Step 01

Get started with an online doctor visit

First, you’ll complete an online doctor visit to answer questions about your medical and smoking history in our secure online portal. For security, we’ll also need you to verify your identity, by taking a photo of yourself and your ID. This is easily done by completing the online doctor visit on your mobile device. You can also use your computer and its webcam.

Step 02

Review your personalized treatment plan

If you choose to request prescription medication, a physician will review your medical and smoking history. If appropriate, they will recommend a 12-week treatment plan of either the Rx or the Rx together with the gum. Your doctor will follow up with any questions via secure messaging, phone or video call.

Step 03

Be proactive—set your quit date

Once your treatment plan arrives, you'll pick a quit date 1-2 weeks in the future. This will allow you to mentally prepare for your quitting journey. If medication is part of your treatment plan, you'll start taking it 1-2 weeks before your quit date. Learn more about bupropion, its potential benefits, and its potential side effects here.

Step 04

Swap cigarettes for your treatment plan

When it’s time to quit, you’ll put down the cigarettes and use your nicotine gum. Doctors recommend using a piece of gum every 1-2 hours for the first six weeks to help fight withdrawal symptoms. You can also reach out to your doctor with medical questions at any time through your My Ro account.

Our product offerings

We use a combination of prescription medication and nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) to help you quit. Start your online doctor visit to find the right treatment plan for you based on your medical and smoking history.

Bupropion

The medication

First month: $18; $45/month after


Prescription bupropion is a smoking cessation aid that can help reduce nicotine cravings and withdrawal symptoms.

Bupropion increases the risk of seizures, hypertension, and angle-closure glaucoma. Bupropion has an NDA boxed warning for increased suicidal thinking in people under 25. Please see important saftey information below.

Bupropion + Gum

The full plan

First month: $60; $87/month after


The combination of prescription bupropion and nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) can increase your chances of quitting by over 3x. *

Bupropion increases the risk of seizures, hypertension, and angle-closure glaucoma. Bupropion has an NDA boxed warning for increased suicidal thinking in people under 25. Please see important saftey information below.

Nicotine gum

Nicotine replacement therapy

First month: $30; $42/month after


Nicotine gum is a nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) that can help reduce withdrawal symptoms like restlessness, irritability and anxiety.

What to expect

You're not in this alone

First month

Month one is all about preparation and determination. Withdrawal can improve as early as day 4, although in general, symptoms do not completely resolve for several weeks. The right treatment helps manage these symptoms. [1] Studies show making it through the first 8 days smoke-free is the best indicator of long-term success.

Second month

Second month For some, the withdrawal symptoms have passed, but studies show [1] that continuing treatment for 7-12 weeks results in the best long-term success. The second month is a great time to rebuild habits around the places and situations that were once go-tos for smoking and could turn into triggers.

Third month

After three months, some people may be smoke-free and ready to discontinue treatment. However, for those that feel they need further treatment, or may be at risk of returning to cigarettes, there is an option to potentially continue treatment through a renewal visit with your doctor.

FAQ

Still didn’t find your answer? Please reach out to our care team at [email protected]

Important safety information

What you should know before taking bupropion.

[1] FDA source

[2] Ashare RL, Wileyto EP, Perkins KA, Schnoll RA. The first 7 days of a quit attempt predicts relapse: validation of a measure for screening medications for nicotine dependence. J Addict Med. 2013 Jul-Aug;7(4):249-54. doi: 10.1097/ADM.0b013e31829363e1. PMID: 23669629; PMCID: PMC3737394. Link